Global warming causing one of the world’s wealthiest countries to become unliveable

Global warming causing one of the world's wealthiest countries to become unliveable

Global warming causing one of the world’s wealthiest countries to become unliveable

Global warming is smashing temperature records all over the world, but Kuwait one of the hottest countries on the planet is fast becoming unliveable. 

In 2016, thermometers hit 54C, the highest reading on Earth in the last 76 years. Last year, for the first time, they breached 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit) in June, weeks ahead of usual peak weather. Parts of Kuwait could get as much as 4.5C hotter from 2071 to 2100 compared with the historical average, according to the Environment Public Authority, making large areas of the country uninhabitable.

The wildlife is almost gone. From dead birds appearing on rooftops in the summer months unable to find shade or water to vets being overburdened with strays that are brought in by people who have found them near death from the heat and extreme dehydration. Even wild foxes are abandoning a desert that no longer blooms after the rains for what small patches of green remain in the city, where they’re treated as pests.

The California-based non-profit Berkeley Earth, in its independent annual global temperature report for 2021, has stated that last year was the sixth warmest one on Earth since 1850, when record-keeping began. 

The last eight years, the report says, have been the eight warmest years on record. Additionally, 25 countries experienced their highest recorded annual average in temperatures, including China, Iran, North and South Korea, Saudi Arabia and Bangladesh. 

In 2021, 87% of the surface of Earth was “significantly” warmer than the average temperature between 1951 and 1980, 11% had a similar temperature and 2.6 per cent was colder.