Asthma patients should self-isolate for 12 weeks to avoid coronavirus

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Asthma patients should self-isolate for 12 weeks to avoid coronavirus

Asthma patients should self-isolate for 12 weeks to avoid coronavirus

Health officials in England say people with asthma should enter a 12-week quarantine to avoid getting coronavirus, according to media reports, Patients with underlying health conditions, including asthma and diabetes, have been instructed by the governments to take extreme measures to shield themselves from the coronavirus (Covid-19).

Patients with underlying health conditions, which includes asthma, were instructed by the United Kingdom government to begin quarantining themselves this weekend.

“By this coming weekend, it will be necessary to go further and to ensure that those with the most serious health conditions are largely shielded from social contact for around 12 weeks,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson said, according to Express.

If you an asthma sufferer you are advised to take the following steps:

  • Keep taking your preventer inhaler daily as prescribed
  • Carry your reliever inhaler
  • Download and use an action plan
  • Start a peak flow diary
  • If you smoke, give up to decrease your risk of complications from Covid-19

You can also reduce the risk of contracting the virus by washing your hands frequently with soap and warm water, using tissues when you sneeze or cough and making sure you put them in the bin, avoiding touching your face, nose or mouth with unwashed hands, and avoiding unnecessary travel or social interaction.

If you are well you do not need to self-isolate – but Asthma UK has said that you should only go out if you need to, and try to keep your distance from others.

If you live with someone who develops symptoms you will need to self-isolate for 14 days, and if you develop symptoms you will need to self-isolate for seven days.

People who have an underlying health condition

Anyone with any of the health conditions listed below are deemed as being high risk:

  • Anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds 
  • Chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
  • Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure

People who have an underlying health condition

Anyone with any of the health conditions listed below are deemed as being high risk:

  • Anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds 
  • Chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
  • Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis
  • Chronic neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy
  • Diabetes
  • Problems with your spleen – for example, sickle cell disease or if you have had your spleen removed
  • A weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy
  • Being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above

There are some clinical conditions which put people are even higher risk of severe illness, Public Health England said.

Anyone on the list below will be contacted directly by NHS England next week with advice for more ‘stringent measures’.